Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Moderators: Moderator
Users Browsing Forum
No Members and 12 Guests

Brexit

  This thread currently has 17,052 views. Print
66 Pages Prev ... 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 ... Next All Recommend Thread
Maringer
February 4, 2019, 1:56pm Report to Moderator
Special Brew Drinker
Posts: 7,886
Posts Per Day: 1.83
Reputation: 82.19%
Rep Score: +52 / -11
Approval: +8,101
To be fair, the Nissan thing isn't just to do with Brexit. They were planning to build the diesel version of the cars over here but sales of diesels have dropped off a cliff in Europe following the pollution scandals in recent years to scaling back production is understandable.

The utter and total uncertainty about what the hell is going on with Brexit (now less than 2 months away!) will have had a lot to do with the decision, but it's not the only factor to be considered.
Logged Offline
Private Message
Reply: 140 - 656
FishOutOfWater
February 4, 2019, 2:04pm Report to Moderator
Barley Wine Drinker
Posts: 10,964
Posts Per Day: 2.55
Reputation: 86.62%
Rep Score: +50 / -7
Location: Goole
Approval: +4,139
Quoted from Maringer
To be fair, the Nissan thing isn't just to do with Brexit. They were planning to build the diesel version of the cars over here but sales of diesels have dropped off a cliff in Europe following the pollution scandals in recent years to scaling back production is understandable.

The utter and total uncertainty about what the hell is going on with Brexit (now less than 2 months away!) will have had a lot to do with the decision, but it's not the only factor to be considered.


The same as JLR a few weeks back when they announced they were cutting their workforce... investment in diesel cars is in general being cut right back because of changes to emission level regulations

Logged Offline
Private Message Skype
Reply: 141 - 656
barralad
February 5, 2019, 9:43am Report to Moderator
Barley Wine Drinker
Posts: 13,079
Posts Per Day: 3.06
Reputation: 80.54%
Rep Score: +79 / -19
Approval: +6,356
Quoted from grimsby pete
If you are a leaver or a  remainer one thing I think we can all agree on is,

The government and May have made a right useless mess of negotiating  any type of deal.


The most culpable are those who tried to peddle the lie that leaving would be easy when with even slight investigation it was patently obvious that to not only disentangle us from 40 years of membership but keep everyone happy was difficult in the extreme. Whether this was done out of a desire to show that the Tories were the natural party of government is perhaps a matter of conjecture but it is crystal clear now why May called the 2017 General Election. Only a decent sized majority would have allowed them to ignore dissension and allowed them to have claimed to deliver on the will of the British people.


I have an inferiority complex-It's not a very good one though.
Logged Online
Private Message
Reply: 142 - 656
MarinerMal
February 6, 2019, 12:58pm Report to Moderator
Lager Top Drinker
Posts: 271
Posts Per Day: 0.08
Reputation: 78.8%
Rep Score: +7 / -2
Approval: +470
Quoted from Maringer
To be fair, the Nissan thing isn't just to do with Brexit. They were planning to build the diesel version of the cars over here but sales of diesels have dropped off a cliff in Europe following the pollution scandals in recent years to scaling back production is understandable.

The utter and total uncertainty about what the hell is going on with Brexit (now less than 2 months away!) will have had a lot to do with the decision, but it's not the only factor to be considered.


I'm sure there were also other business reasons besides Brexit for the decision but Brexit was certainly part of it. The fact still remains though, it's another negative impact of Brexit. We are heavily invested in by foreign companies who will not hesitate to abandon us if they see being in an EU country serves them better than being in a country that wants to leave. What can we offer these foreign countries that the EU cannot?

I am struggling at the moment see what positives have come from the whole Brexit mess at the moment. The only arguments I see from Bexiteers like Jacob Rees-Mogg (the guy who moved his own companies HQ to Dublin to avoid Brexit fallout) is that it is all down to Project Fear. When quite clearly it is closer to Project Reality.

It's about time we started to face up to fact and admit the majority were mislead by those serving self interest and not national interest.

Logged Offline
Private Message
Reply: 143 - 656
FishOutOfWater
February 6, 2019, 1:51pm Report to Moderator
Barley Wine Drinker
Posts: 10,964
Posts Per Day: 2.55
Reputation: 86.62%
Rep Score: +50 / -7
Location: Goole
Approval: +4,139
Quoted from MarinerMal


I'm sure there were also other business reasons besides Brexit for the decision but Brexit was certainly part of it. The fact still remains though, it's another negative impact of Brexit. We are heavily invested in by foreign companies who will not hesitate to abandon us if they see being in an EU country serves them better than being in a country that wants to leave. What can we offer these foreign countries that the EU cannot?

I am struggling at the moment see what positives have come from the whole Brexit mess at the moment. The only arguments I see from Bexiteers like Jacob Rees-Mogg (the guy who moved his own companies HQ to Dublin to avoid Brexit fallout) is that it is all down to Project Fear. When quite clearly it is closer to Project Reality.

It's about time we started to face up to fact and admit the majority were mislead by those serving self interest and not national interest.





In short, by the Conservatives... they led the county in to this mess, they're the ones "in charge" of negotiations and out of or in Europe, they'll be around until the next election. Heaven help us!!
Logged Offline
Private Message Skype
Reply: 144 - 656
Maringer
February 6, 2019, 2:33pm Report to Moderator
Special Brew Drinker
Posts: 7,886
Posts Per Day: 1.83
Reputation: 82.19%
Rep Score: +52 / -11
Approval: +8,101
Let's not forget that the EU/Japan free trade agreement went into effect at the start of this month - a deal which covers a third of the world's GDP in total. So, pretty big.

A no deal Brexit will see us drop us out of this deal at the end of March.
Logged Offline
Private Message
Reply: 145 - 656
KingstonMariner
February 6, 2019, 10:57pm Report to Moderator
Barley Wine Drinker
Posts: 13,782
Posts Per Day: 7.04
Reputation: 82.35%
Rep Score: +34 / -7
Approval: +12,988
Quoted from Marinerz93


The EU falls down on command of operations, only the British, French (much lower than UK), have any real command of operations that are in the EU.

The US hicks have an enormous amount of experience in operations and have been funding NATO more or less since it was formed and are a superpower and you think an over zealous Belgian MEP with holes in his pockets and plans of dominance, can match the infrastructure needed to replace NATO, the US can call on spy satellites to unmanned drones. This has cost billions to put in place and the rest of the EU are so far behind it's like looking at the Flintstones taking on Predator.

Putin has bemoaned that he feels the US/NATO have surrounded Russia the difference is the language used, Verhofstadt has made speeches in Brussels that the EU Army must front up to Russia, a show of force, is that not a more aggressive stance than what NATO has done.

An EU federal army won't happen, far too expensive, you may get a officer command training station, what will happen and is happening is each country will submit command of it's forces to France or Germany like it currently does now so deployable, interoperable force under a single command carrying out EU foreign policy. You still haven't addressed the cost, some of the EU countries are putting less than the agreed 2% of GDP into defence of their own countries and you think that an EU army can replace NATO.


Like I said it all takes time. And money. But half the reason Russia feels threatened is because this infrastructure gives NATO (the US) offensive capabilities that you say Europe couldn't hope to match unless it ups spending significantly over many years. But it could defend itself.


Oi niitä aikoja, oi niitä aikoja
Ne tahtoisin niin elää uudelleen
Tuo aika rakkauden
Tuo aika nuoruuden
Ne tahtoisin niin elää uudelleen
Logged Offline
Private Message
Reply: 146 - 656
KingstonMariner
February 6, 2019, 11:14pm Report to Moderator
Barley Wine Drinker
Posts: 13,782
Posts Per Day: 7.04
Reputation: 82.35%
Rep Score: +34 / -7
Approval: +12,988
Quoted from louth_in_the_south
What solid evidence have you got that would happen?


Don't you believe your own industry's trade body? Those people don't give a excrement what happens unless it affects their back pockets. And they've come out and said it hits their back pockets.


Oi niitä aikoja, oi niitä aikoja
Ne tahtoisin niin elää uudelleen
Tuo aika rakkauden
Tuo aika nuoruuden
Ne tahtoisin niin elää uudelleen
Logged Offline
Private Message
Reply: 147 - 656
KingstonMariner
February 6, 2019, 11:16pm Report to Moderator
Barley Wine Drinker
Posts: 13,782
Posts Per Day: 7.04
Reputation: 82.35%
Rep Score: +34 / -7
Approval: +12,988
Quoted from louth_in_the_south
All we got from the politicians from both parties and the media before the referendum was that there would be mass unemployment and recession. Didn’t happen. The opposite actually. So why believe them now and throw the democratic vote in the bin ?


We haven't left yet. We have already seen some of the warning signs (like cancellation of investment plans, relocation of some financial services out of the UK).


Oi niitä aikoja, oi niitä aikoja
Ne tahtoisin niin elää uudelleen
Tuo aika rakkauden
Tuo aika nuoruuden
Ne tahtoisin niin elää uudelleen
Logged Offline
Private Message
Reply: 148 - 656
KingstonMariner
February 6, 2019, 11:25pm Report to Moderator
Barley Wine Drinker
Posts: 13,782
Posts Per Day: 7.04
Reputation: 82.35%
Rep Score: +34 / -7
Approval: +12,988
Quoted from forza ivano
without spiking maringer's guns id say the job losses would be widespread through all sectors. the transfer of financial services jobs to Europe and the problems the car industry would face have been widely covered. Tariffs on imported goods would lead to higher prices and less household spending so the retail sector would be quickly affected. Tariffs on exports would lead to our goods becoming too expensive for foreign customers to buy (although the expected collapse in the exchange rate may mitigate that). There would be an almost immediate cessation of new investment - who's going to spend money on new technology/facilities or simple expansion when the country is grinding to a halt? Companies are going to look to cut costs immediately so temps and zero hours staff would feel it immediately. Agriculture would be badly hit, bizarre to think that so many farmers are enthusiastic brexiteers.
there are so many implications - the whole thing is like peeling an onion, you just discover layer after layer of reprecussions. the exchange rate collapses so the EU workers on who we rely find its not worth staying here; not when they can move to Europe and get similar jobs, be closer to home and earn much more (its already happening in the building industry). What happens then to our care sector, our builders and to the hospitality and warehousing industries?

not a prospect i'd like to experience!

the only minor silver lining for no deal would be that it'd certainly sort out the brexit question once and for all. If after a couple of years of doom and chaos it looks like we're surviving and starting to move forward, then Johnson et al have been proved right and everythings hunky dory. if its a complete disaster then the Brexiteers and Little Englanders might finally shut up and a new government would take us back into Europe to try and make up the lost years


I made this point to someone a while back. And she, probably correctly, pointed out it won't quiet the conspiracy theorists. They'd still cook up excuses that it was all the fault of Remoaners for not doing Brexit properly. Don't expect consistency from people that one minute say,' we can do a deal easily, we can do a Norway or a Switzerland', then when they find it's not so easy say 'I told you you can't trust these Europeans to negotiate fairly', or when they find out what a Norway deal actually entails say 'out means out'.


Oi niitä aikoja, oi niitä aikoja
Ne tahtoisin niin elää uudelleen
Tuo aika rakkauden
Tuo aika nuoruuden
Ne tahtoisin niin elää uudelleen
Logged Offline
Private Message
Reply: 149 - 656
66 Pages Prev ... 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 ... Next All Recommend Thread
Print


Thread Rating
There is currently no rating for this thread
 

Back to top of page

This is not an official forum of Grimsby Town Football Club, the opinions expressed are those of the individual authors. If you see an offensive post then click "Report" on the relevant post. Posts will be deleted at the discretion of the moderators whose decision is final. Posts should abide by the Forum Rules. IP addresses of contributors together with dates and times of access are stored. The opinions and viewpoints expressed by contributors to The Fishy are their own and not necessarily those of The Fishy. The Fishy makes no claims that information dispersed through this forum is accurate or reliable. Also The Fishy cannot be held liable for any statements made by contributors of The Fishy.